Collaboration

The best career advice from this year’s graduation speeches

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This year's headline-grabbing commencement speeches have been high on thinly veiled critiques of the Trump administration and big on dire warnings about the state of American democracy.

Former secretary of state Rex Tillerson cautioned graduates at Virginia Military Institute about the end of American democracy if Americans don't “confront the crisis of ethics and integrity in our society and among our leaders.” Michael Bloomberg talked at Rice University of the threat from “our own willingness to tolerate dishonesty in service of party and in pursuit of power.” And 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, raising a Russian ushanka hat as part of a Yale University tradition, said Sunday that “we're living through a full-fledged crisis in our democracy,” telling students “to stay vigilant, to neither close our eyes, nor numb our hearts or throw up our hands.”

But not all of this year's graduation speeches are quite so political or cautionary. A few — though not many — seemed to remember that they were speaking before a group of people who were about to embark upon life as adults who will have to navigate the politics of the workplace, the complexities of new relationships and the decisions of adult life. (Oprah Winfrey to USC Annenberg School for Communications and Journalism graduates: “Invest in a quality mattress. Your back will thank you later.")

Here, some of the best advice offered by this year's commencement speakers so far that graduates — or anyone — can apply to their work and careers:

Oprah Winfrey, chair and CEO of OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network, Annenberg School for Communications and Journalism at the University of Southern California

Winfrey, whose past speeches have drawn speculation that she might be planning a run for president — a rumor she has squashed — got plenty of attention for her calls for graduates to vote in her speech at USC on May 11. But after offering a litany of practical wisdom (“Eat a good breakfast,” she said. “Pay your bills on time. Recycle.") she also added some clear advice for graduates' time in the workplace.

“The number one lesson I can offer you where your work is concerned,” said the media titan, “is this: Become so skilled, so vigilant, so flat-out fantastic at what you do, that your talent cannot be dismissed.”

She also countered the typical “do what you love” advice that fill so many graduation speeches with something else. “You need to know this: Your job is not always going to fulfill you,” she said. “There will be some days that you just might be bored. Other days you may not feel like going to work at all. Go anyway, and remember that your job is not who you are. It’s just what you are doing on the way to who you will become. With every remedial chore, every boss who takes credit for your ideas — that is going to happen — look for the lessons, because the lessons are always there.” (Read More...)

How Generation Z Is Shaping The Change In Education

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By Sieve Kozinsky

Forbes

Generation Z has officially entered college. And just as the Millennials before them, this generation is disrupting the way learning happens in higher education. But these differences go beyond just a greater dependence on technology. Gen Z-ers tend to embrace social learning environments, where they can be hands-on and directly involved in the learning process. They expect on-demand services that are available at any time and with low barriers to access. And they tend to be more career-focused earlier on in their college careers.

A study done by Barnes and Noble College shows that today’s students refuse to be passive learners. They aren’t interested in simply showing up for class, sitting through a lecture, and taking notes that they’ll memorize for an exam later on. Instead, they expect to be fully engaged and to be a part of the learning process themselves.

In fact, Gen Z students tend to thrive when they are given the opportunity to have a fully immersive educational experience and they even enjoy the challenges of being a part of it. For instance, 51% of surveyed students said they learn best by doing while only 12% said they learn through listening. These same students also mentioned they tend to enjoy class discussions and interactive classroom environments over the traditional dissemination teaching method. (Read More...)

 

 

Rethinking Design, from Scratch

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When we set out to build our next-generation platform, we took the time-tested user-centered approach. In addition to our own platform, we took a hard look at the other tools people are using, how they’re using them, and what they’ve come to expect. Starting from scratch we knew we had a monumental task on our hands, but we were confident if we focused on the right things we’d be successful.

In business, Jeff Bezos advises focus on the things that are not going to change. We think the same applies for any individual product so we came up with a list of things we knew would not change to help focus and inform our work. This is what we came up with:

  • Users would always need access to common functions like search and filter content, read text, click links and buttons, enter data into forms, etc.

  • Users would always benefit from a consistent user experience

  • Users would always need access on screens of wildly varying sizes

  • Users needs and desires would always be changing

  • No matter how big we got, we would always wish we had more resources than we had

We needed an approach that would be economical to build and maintain and provide the foundation so that even if we couldn’t know what might need to build down the road, we wouldn’t discover we’d painted ourselves into a corner.

To meet these the requirements, we developed the Tenlegs Design System.

Design systems alleviate many of the problems that arise from the more traditional design approach of developing a static style guide then designing new features on top of that. With a design system, the style guide and the features are one and the same.

The design system we’ve built at Tenlegs has enabled our small team to deliver solutions for the ever-changing needs of diverse college and university populations in record time.

You can read about design systems and atomic design here and here, but the basic metaphor behind the concept is that we design interfaces from a hierarchy of structures analogous to those found in nature:

  • Atoms (interface elements like buttons and menus) are assembled into..

  • Molecules (functional blocks like content cards and forms);

  • Different molecules into organisms (like search applications and workflows);

  • Organisms coexist in an environment (such as user administration and event management). The design system even accommodates breakpoints so we can deliver the right experience for the user’s screen size.

Design systems are the most economical way to...

  • Give leverage to small teams

  • Enable scale to large teams

  • Increase design speed

  • Increase development speed

  • Ease maintenance

  • Ease testing

  • Improve overall user experience

  • Ensure high-quality product

  • Increase consistency across products and platforms

A design system lets you “set it and forget it” for all the constituent components.

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When you put them all together, you get products that work well and look great without having to tinker and tweak.

The heavy lifting up front has paid off. Our design system continues to grow and evolve. New features can be built in minutes or hours where they might have taken days or weeks. With a design system, we get to focus more on the user and helping her to achieve goals in a consistent way, rather than reinventing for each new problem.

Building Community in Online Courses

Authored by Dr. Kathleen Stone, Western Governors University

In November, I presented at the AAACE annual conference on research I completed as part of an Ed.D in Higher Education and Adult Learning. My research explored how adult online students at a small rural community college described a sense of school community when completing online courses. I wanted to understand their perceptions of the presence of a sense of school community and what aspects they felt could contribute to successful completion of online courses. From this small qualitative case study, I found students did not perceive a sense of school community, yet they felt having a greater sense of school community would help them successfully complete online courses. What is school community and why look at this factor when exploring online course completion rates?

A sense of community in an online environment includes two distinct aspects: classroom community and school community. A sense of community in the online classroom has been the focus of much research in distance learning (Childress & Spurgin, 2009; Rovai, Wighting, & Lucking, 2004). However, less attention and research has been given to the culture and climate that makes up a school community in the online environment (Childress & Spurgin, 2009; Rovai, Wighting, & Liu, 2005). School community has two dimensions: social community and learning community. A school’s social community involves “spirit, cohesion, trust, safety, trade, interdependence, and a sense of belonging” (Rovai et al., 2004, p. 267). A school’s learning community consists of the feelings of learning community members regarding the degree to which they share group norms and values and the extent to which their educational goals and expectations are satisfied by group membership (Rovai et al., 2004, p. 267). (Read More...)

 

Community engagement and collaborations can strengthen the bottom line of nonprofits

Coming Together from a Place of Strength, Not Weakness

Nonprofits are facing increased pressure to develop new and more efficient ways to deliver on their missions. Thoughtful and unconventional collaborations can strengthen the bottom line of nonprofits while delivering added value to their communities.

Authored by Carrie Fox

Authored by Carrie Fox

In January, Leadership Montgomery, a small but influential nonprofit leadership center in Maryland, unveiled its new strategic plan, complete with a new mission, vision, and way of talking about the organization’s community impact.

This shift followed a time of deep reflection for the organization. For nearly 30 years, Leadership Montgomery had brought together private, public, and nonprofit professionals through leadership trainings and service activities that broaden perspectives and build connections for community improvement. But with a new CEO at the helm, it was time for a step back to move forward—to reframe tired language and re-examine the organization’s role and relevance within the community.

Leadership Montgomery timed the unveiling of its new strategic plan so that it coincided with the announcement of a major expansion of its programming—via the addition of another small but influential nonprofit called the Corporate Volunteer Council of Montgomery County (CVC). CVC trains businesses on how to build effective volunteer and charitable programs, and it too had been going through a time of reflection; its board wondered how it would or could scale CVC’s model to more effectively interlace with the region’s business and community leaders.

“The needs of our county have evolved,” said Leadership Montgomery’s new CEO during the public announcement. “As I’ve listened to what our members, our graduates, and our partners desire in leadership programming, I’ve realized without hesitation that with CVC, we can deliver more for those whom we support, and we can pull our community closer together in the process.” (Read more...)

Learning In The Age Of Digital Distraction

LA Johnson/NPR

LA Johnson/NPR

Authored by Eric Westervelt

Maybe the smart phone's hegemony makes perfect evolutionary sense: Humans are tapping a deep urge to seek out information. Our ancient food-foraging survival instinct has evolved into an info-foraging obsession; one that prompts many of us today to constantly check our phones and multitask.

Monkey see. Click. Swipe. Reward.

A new book The Distracted Mind: Ancient Brains in a High Tech World explores the implications of, and brain science behind, this evolution (some might say devolution)It was written Adam Gazzaley, a neurologist and a professor at the University of California, San Francisco, and research psychologist Larry D. Rosen.

Our friends at NPR's Shots blog recently spoke with one of the authors about distraction's impact on productivity. I wanted to talk with Dr. Gazzaley about what his research tells us about teaching, learning, studying and screen time in the age of digital distraction.

From food foragers to information foragers. Mechanisms that developed in our brain for survival have now evolved to include information foraging?

Correct. We see it in other primates and we believe that this is sort of a hijacking or an evolution of that same system that was critical for our survival in terms of seeking out food has now been directed at seeking out information.

Adam, we engage this info-foraging, this distraction even when that behavior is self-destructive or counterproductive?

Yes, some behaviors that drive us, like even addictive behaviors, might have some positive reward reinforcement and then many other negative consequences. (Read More...)

 

Interdisciplinary Research at GW

Authored

Authored

We are at an exciting time in GW’s history for studying engineering. The Science and Engineering Hall just had its grand opening this past March. You’ll be riding the nationwide surge for college students studying STEM fields. You’ll get to live in DC, where policy and technology are evolving every day. Whether you see yourself as a biomedical engineer planning for medical school, a systems engineer aiming for a job in finance or business management, or even an uncertain engineering student...Read More..

Diversity, Inclusion, and Leadership

     Authored

    Authored

The United States is known as a melting pot of races, ethnicities, religions, cultures, and traditions, and has always prided itself on that description. We have only grown more diverse as a nation over time; moreover, new media has allowed for a significant increase in racial/ethnic group identity and pride, not to mention an easy and effective way to share information and organize for change (Shivers 2004). Read More...

Collaborating with NYU Stern

NYU Stern is launching several innovative programs and we are honored to partner with them to support these innovative efforts. Their Masters of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) Program is one such example. Over the course of the program, students from many corners of the world participate in the NYU Stern MSBA program, and must frequently collaborate and interact with one another from a distance. That’s where Tenlegs comes in! Our secure, privately-branded platform allows MSBA students to connect and get to know one another prior to actually meeting in person on campus. Students’ profiles and portfolios on our platform serve as introductions to the community and facilitate engagement between students, faculty, and alumni.

The Tenlegs platform also enables NYU Stern MSBA community to create, share and comment on ideas to begin forming groups for their final projects. In private groups, students can seamlessly communicate, share documents, work toward their final presentation, and invite in a faculty advisor at any time in the process.

The ability to get acquainted, share, and collaborate via the Tenlegs platform makes geographical boundaries irrelevant and allows NYU Stern MSBA students to engage even from their many corners of the world.

We’re excited to support the NYU Stern MSBA program and its students to help create their global community and foster cross-border and cross-cultural collaboration! How can Tenlegs help your school community? To learn more click here.

DePauw University School of Music’s launches innovative 21CM program to prepare musicians for the next century

Today’s musical landscape has evolved to include all kinds of sounds, instruments, and musical performances. No longer do professional and aspiring musicians fit neatly into genres defined by history or expectations.

In fact, the 21st Century Musician is often responsible for charting their own course and carving out a niche within which to practice and share their art with their fans and the world. To cultivate the talent and connections among these pioneering musicians of the 21st century, our partners at DePauw University School of Music have built an online community called 21CM, and we’re thrilled to be a part!

According to 21CM, the 21st Century Musician is a motivated and entrepreneurial individual who is evolving the musical landscape and creating opportunities for themselves and fellow musicians through their work. 21CM aims to highlight the accomplishments of these musicians through the online magazine at 21CM.org, and also offers educational and informational resources, and an online, collaborative platform called The Hub.

21CM.org

As of Thursday, January 29, 21CM went live with the public launch of the online website 21CM.org. The website is an online, professional resource created expressly to help serious musicians thrive in today’s modern musical landscape. 21CM.org is designed for musicians at various stages of their career. Edited through DePauw and written by renowned journalists, administrators and artists in the field, our content covers the people, organizations and projects advancing our art form– from musical icons to up-and-comers. Follow 21CM onTwitter or Facebook.

Along with DePauw and Tenlegs, the creative team behind 21CM includes editorial development – Scott Timberg and Mark McCoy (Dean of DePauw School of Music); website design – Jennifer Logan and Studio Fuse; and creative/editorial direction – Elizabeth Hinckley of Definitive Culture.

Become a foundational member of 21CM and The Hub – create your profile, join a project, and start making connections with musicians worldwide!

Tenlegs’ Role

Tenlegs is honored to work with and support DePauw School of Music in this endeavor. In addition to the digital magazine and resources, 21CM is leveraging the Tenlegs Partner Network to provideThe Hub, a collaborative, social online platform for 21st Century Musicians to showcase and share their work, and to connect and collaborate with fellow artists and musicians. We’re excited to be an integral part of this important new network for pioneering professional and aspiring musicians. Learn more about 21CM here.