Career Counseling

Preparing For Life After Graduation

Photo: iStock

Photo: iStock

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As college graduation season is nearly upon us, students and parents alike are beginning to focus more intensively than ever before on what’s required to land a great role in an exciting field – one with good compensation and room for growth – in today’s ever-changing job market.

In my career coaching work, and as a parent myself of grown children who are forging their way to creating professional lives they’ll enjoy and find rewarding, I know there are hundreds of questions that new graduates needs answered, in terms of how to best position themselves for success in the working world.

To help answer those pivotal questions, I was thrilled to catch up this week with Austin Belcak. Belcak is the founder of Cultivated Culture where he helps people leverage unconventional strategies to land jobs they love without connections, without experience, and without applying online. His strategies have helped people get hired at Google, Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter, and more

I recently interviewed Belcak in my Finding Bravepodcast on How To Land a Dream Job at the Salary You Deserve, and was riveted by his personal story of how he turned his failure (to land ANY employment at all after graduation), to creating phenomenal success, along with his tips for graduates who feel they don't have the experience and connections that others have. (Read More...)

 

Things I Wish I Knew Senior Year of College

PAUL BRADBURY VIA GETTY IMAGES

PAUL BRADBURY VIA GETTY IMAGES

Authored by Samantha Matt

I was so naive and entitled during senior year of college. I thought I was on top of the world. All of my friends lived within walking distance of me, so I had someone to hang out with at all times. I could finally legally go to bars, so go out an average of four times a week I did. I was taking classes I was actually interested in, so my grades were pretty decent without having to try. And I already had completed four internships, so I figured my resume was basically set to score me a job after graduation no matter what. I was walking on air. I thought I was great. I thought I was awesome. I thought I was special. Little did I know I was in for a wake up call that was going to rock my little universe. That wake up call being the real world.

My conceited attitude about myself quickly changed when I moved back home, far away from all my friends, and started to get rejected by job after job. Eight months after graduation, I was finally offered my first job. It took eight months. At that very moment, I realized that I wasn’t special. The life I was living then was not the life I had pictured for myself post-college eight months prior. I knew I was going to have to put myself out there and gain a hell of a lot more experience (which I honestly thought I had at age 22) to be successful in the future.

Now, I probably could have sped up this thought process a bit if my senior year self was aware of a few things. Here are 11 things I wish I knew in college:

1. Network, network, network. Networking is like life. It might be awkward, but you have to deal with it... and it never gets any easier. The more out of college you are, the less of a chance you’ll have to talk to prominent people in your industry. Read More...

 

Social Network Effects in Hiring

Photograph by Nancy Rothstein

Photograph by Nancy Rothstein

Authored by Laura Geller

Authored by Laura Geller

Job seekers are keenly aware that who they know matters. A contact at a prospective employer can push a resume to the top of the pile, put in a good word, or arrange an introductory lunch. Companies, for their part, are happy to oblige. Employee referrals help them cut through the noise, target searches, and save money.

Social networks play a positive role in the hiring process. But what can these useful connections tell us about performance on the job? Does the advantage of knowing someone carry over once an individual joins a firm? Adina Sterling has been asking these questions since transitioning from engineer to academic nearly a decade ago. Sterling had spent five years with Procter & Gamble’s global baby care and beauty care R&D teams before leaving to pursue a Ph.D. in organization and management. She joined the faculty of Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business as an assistant professor in the fall of 2015. Read More...

The Business of Healthcare: Preparing Students to Tackle a Challenging Industry

Authored

Authored

Shaan Patel’s path to business school was a little different than most. With three years of medical school under his belt, the Las Vegas native traded the University of Southern California (USC) for Yale School of Management (SOM), where he’ll complete his MBA before returning to USC for his final year of med school.

“As a medical student, I wanted to learn more about healthcare management,” he says. Yale SOM has been great, he continues, offering plenty of healthcare electives as well as opportunities to collaborate with the Yale School of Medicine. “One of the problems with medical school is that you become so focused on the pathophysiology of disease and clinical medicine that there’s not much exposure to the business side of medicine, healthcare administration, insurance,” he says. One Yale SOM class in particular—“Healthcare, Economics, Finance and Policy”—helped him learn about things like Medicare, Medicaid and the roles played by pharmaceutical and insurance companies. “Most medical students have to learn those things on the job after they are in practice,” Patel notes. Read More...

The Best Business Schools for Careers in Technology

Authored

Authored

Here’s a fact you may not have known: Several of today’s leading technology innovators share one thing in common—a Montessori education. Yep, Google’s Larry Page and Sergei Brin, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, and SimCity creator Will Wright were all educated as children using the self-directed, hands-on, collaborative teaching model developed by Italian doctor and educator Maria Montessori. Alas, though, not a single one has an MBA—so perhaps not a very useful factoid when you’re trying to determine the best business schools for a career in technology.

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Microsoft’s Bill Gates, Apple’s Steve Jobs, Michael Dell, Biz Stone of Twitter—none of them has an MBA either. And Facebook second-in-command Sheryl Sandberg, who does have an MBA from Harvard Business School, is famously on record recently saying the degree isn’t necessary for success in tech. Nevertheless, a growing tide of students are looking to use business school as their launch pad to successful careers in tech—and the top tech firms, including those founded by non-MBAs, are snapping them up.

Why, you ask? Read More...

5 Things College Career Counselors Wish Students Knew

Career counselors know students are new to job searching and are happy to start from the beginning.

Career counselors know students are new to job searching and are happy to start from the beginning.

Authored by Robin Reshwan, founder of Collegial Services, a consulting/staffing firm that connects college students, recent graduates and the organizations that hire them and a certified Women’s Business Enterprise (WBE).

How students can begin their professional development with on-campus resources

The college career center is a magical place on campus that’s solely dedicated to assisting students with the pursuit of internships andcareers after graduation. While it may vary in title, the college career center typically offers resources, events, job postings and advice during the academic year. In my business, we work with more than 70 career centers throughout the United States. Often, the dedicated staff in these departments see similar trends when students make the transition from college to career.

Here are the things that college career counselors wish every student knew:

1. The career center exists. Statistics vary among campuses, but in general, the majority of college students do not visit the career center nor participate in any of its events during their academic career. This is a shame on so many levels.

First, most students go to college so that they can be employed after graduation. Not checking out the center dedicated to supporting this goal is the same as paying for a class and never actually attending. You may be one of the few people that can ace the test without ever seeing the material, but most of us need at least a little preparation to pass. Read More...

 

Integrating (and Actually Using) Career Advising Data on Campus

Authored by Dominique “Domy” Raymond, Senior Program Director, National Engagement & Philanthropy at USA Funds

As a friend in higher education recently noted, many, if not most, campuses have a “Mr. Potato Head” approach to career advising and job placement services, which often appear to be last-minute, bolt-on activities for students. But, are there ways to seamlessly align career advising throughout a student’s college experience? What career advising and outcomes data do schools need to collect and integrate into their academic programs as well as their career services? Read More...



Rethinking the Role of College Career Centers for Humanities Graduates

Authored by Dr. Brian C. Mitchell Director of the Edvance Foundation

Numerous studies indicate that the skills produced by a quality liberal arts education correspond precisely to what employers seek beyond technical training. The ability to articulate, write, apply quantitative methods, use technology, and work in a collaborative setting will continue to shape the parameters of the skill set needed in the 21st century.

So, why do liberal arts graduates, especially humanities majors, suffer from inaccurate and inconsistent portrayals of their attractiveness to employers?

There are likely several reasons behind this inconsistency.

Liberal arts graduates, especially in the humanities, do not as easily transition into first jobs as students also trained, for example, in STEM disciplines, teaching, nursing or business. For many of these humanities students, the move to employment typically includes additional education at the graduate or professional level. Some of them are uncertain about career paths while others received limited guidance as their graduation day approaches. Read More...

College Career Services and Their Role in Boosting Post-graduation Employment

Authored by John Gower

One element of a college education that many students may not initially consider is that of career preparation. Academic coursework and professor interactions provide students with an analytical framework to solve problems and subject matter knowledge. The role of career services, however, is to help translate that knowledge into the next step after college – namely, employment or graduate school.

The results speak for themselves: utilizing university-affiliated resources is the most effective way to obtain a job.

An analysis of over 68,000 undergraduate responses at 16 American public and private institutions revealed that 56% of students reported a school-related resource or opportunity as the primary factor in obtaining employment after graduation. Read More...