Career Services Software

The Business of Healthcare: Preparing Students to Tackle a Challenging Industry

Authored

Authored

Shaan Patel’s path to business school was a little different than most. With three years of medical school under his belt, the Las Vegas native traded the University of Southern California (USC) for Yale School of Management (SOM), where he’ll complete his MBA before returning to USC for his final year of med school.

“As a medical student, I wanted to learn more about healthcare management,” he says. Yale SOM has been great, he continues, offering plenty of healthcare electives as well as opportunities to collaborate with the Yale School of Medicine. “One of the problems with medical school is that you become so focused on the pathophysiology of disease and clinical medicine that there’s not much exposure to the business side of medicine, healthcare administration, insurance,” he says. One Yale SOM class in particular—“Healthcare, Economics, Finance and Policy”—helped him learn about things like Medicare, Medicaid and the roles played by pharmaceutical and insurance companies. “Most medical students have to learn those things on the job after they are in practice,” Patel notes. Read More...

The Best Business Schools for Careers in Technology

Authored

Authored

Here’s a fact you may not have known: Several of today’s leading technology innovators share one thing in common—a Montessori education. Yep, Google’s Larry Page and Sergei Brin, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, and SimCity creator Will Wright were all educated as children using the self-directed, hands-on, collaborative teaching model developed by Italian doctor and educator Maria Montessori. Alas, though, not a single one has an MBA—so perhaps not a very useful factoid when you’re trying to determine the best business schools for a career in technology.

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Microsoft’s Bill Gates, Apple’s Steve Jobs, Michael Dell, Biz Stone of Twitter—none of them has an MBA either. And Facebook second-in-command Sheryl Sandberg, who does have an MBA from Harvard Business School, is famously on record recently saying the degree isn’t necessary for success in tech. Nevertheless, a growing tide of students are looking to use business school as their launch pad to successful careers in tech—and the top tech firms, including those founded by non-MBAs, are snapping them up.

Why, you ask? Read More...

Consulting Career Prep at NYU’s Stern School of Business

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If you want to earn an MBA with the end goal of pursuing a consulting career, many schools in theNew York City metro area may be a perfect match. For instance, New York University’s Stern School of Business had 28% of its 2015 graduates accept jobs in the consulting field. Furthermore, eight prominent consulting firms hired three or more graduates from the Stern School each in 2014. Consulting employers include the Boston Consulting Group, McKinsey & Company, and PricewaterhouseCoopers.

To prepare its students for these consulting careers, the Stern School offers Read More...

Integrating (and Actually Using) Career Advising Data on Campus

Authored by Dominique “Domy” Raymond, Senior Program Director, National Engagement & Philanthropy at USA Funds

As a friend in higher education recently noted, many, if not most, campuses have a “Mr. Potato Head” approach to career advising and job placement services, which often appear to be last-minute, bolt-on activities for students. But, are there ways to seamlessly align career advising throughout a student’s college experience? What career advising and outcomes data do schools need to collect and integrate into their academic programs as well as their career services? Read More...



10 Future Trends in College Career Services

Co-authored by Farouk Dey (@faroukdey) and Christine Y. Cruzvergara (@ccruzvergara)

Something has been brewing in college career services lately; a movement for change in the way we think and the way we do our work to help students transition from college to careers. More than a third of programs presented at the 2014 National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) conference involved the themes of change, transformation, and future trends. Leaders from small and large, public and private, and rural and urban universities around the country are leaning forward and leading the emerging paradigm shift in college career services.

Evolution of Career Services

This is not the first major evolution of college career services. Changes in societal norms and economic conditions preceded each of the last four paradigm shifts, and this time is no different. Read More...

 

Rethinking the Role of College Career Centers for Humanities Graduates

Authored by Dr. Brian C. Mitchell Director of the Edvance Foundation

Numerous studies indicate that the skills produced by a quality liberal arts education correspond precisely to what employers seek beyond technical training. The ability to articulate, write, apply quantitative methods, use technology, and work in a collaborative setting will continue to shape the parameters of the skill set needed in the 21st century.

So, why do liberal arts graduates, especially humanities majors, suffer from inaccurate and inconsistent portrayals of their attractiveness to employers?

There are likely several reasons behind this inconsistency.

Liberal arts graduates, especially in the humanities, do not as easily transition into first jobs as students also trained, for example, in STEM disciplines, teaching, nursing or business. For many of these humanities students, the move to employment typically includes additional education at the graduate or professional level. Some of them are uncertain about career paths while others received limited guidance as their graduation day approaches. Read More...

College Career Services and Their Role in Boosting Post-graduation Employment

Authored by John Gower

One element of a college education that many students may not initially consider is that of career preparation. Academic coursework and professor interactions provide students with an analytical framework to solve problems and subject matter knowledge. The role of career services, however, is to help translate that knowledge into the next step after college – namely, employment or graduate school.

The results speak for themselves: utilizing university-affiliated resources is the most effective way to obtain a job.

An analysis of over 68,000 undergraduate responses at 16 American public and private institutions revealed that 56% of students reported a school-related resource or opportunity as the primary factor in obtaining employment after graduation. Read More...