Technology

How Generation Z Is Shaping The Change In Education

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By Sieve Kozinsky

Forbes

Generation Z has officially entered college. And just as the Millennials before them, this generation is disrupting the way learning happens in higher education. But these differences go beyond just a greater dependence on technology. Gen Z-ers tend to embrace social learning environments, where they can be hands-on and directly involved in the learning process. They expect on-demand services that are available at any time and with low barriers to access. And they tend to be more career-focused earlier on in their college careers.

A study done by Barnes and Noble College shows that today’s students refuse to be passive learners. They aren’t interested in simply showing up for class, sitting through a lecture, and taking notes that they’ll memorize for an exam later on. Instead, they expect to be fully engaged and to be a part of the learning process themselves.

In fact, Gen Z students tend to thrive when they are given the opportunity to have a fully immersive educational experience and they even enjoy the challenges of being a part of it. For instance, 51% of surveyed students said they learn best by doing while only 12% said they learn through listening. These same students also mentioned they tend to enjoy class discussions and interactive classroom environments over the traditional dissemination teaching method. (Read More...)

 

 

Talent and Technology Are Keys to Higher Ed Success

Authored by Joanna Young

EdTech

The list of challenges facing higher education is long: At the top are state disinvestment, increasing competition for research dollars, price pressure, Title IX and new market entrants. Yet our economy depends on the success of higher ed institutions; a well-educated workforce is critical to the U.S. economy.

Our industry is poised to see a wave of integrations and closures. Moody’s predicts a tripling of college closures in coming years. Generally, the smaller the institution and the endowment, the more susceptible the college. The largest and most well-endowed institutions may feel immune, thinking they are “too big to fail.” Yet in reality, in the digital economy, no institution is immune. Leaders and boards of directors should plan today for how to transform themselves tomorrow.

The Competition Is On

Reliance on net tuition remains high, averaging more than 45 percent nationwide, 10 percent higher than during the most recent recession. Tuition is rising at rates of 7 to 8 percent, well above the inflation rate. Competition for students is increasing. In many regions (for example, the Midwest and Northeast), the number of high school graduates is declining, and many public institutions are competing for out-of-state and international students, who pay more and thus subsidize in-state students. This combination presents a challenge.

To perform well in the face of such challenges, institutions need to invest deliberately and heavily in two things: talent and technology. In particular, “top 100” institutions that pride themselves on quality of education and research should have quality of technology and talent to match.

(Read More...)

The Best Business Schools for Careers in Technology

Authored

Authored

Here’s a fact you may not have known: Several of today’s leading technology innovators share one thing in common—a Montessori education. Yep, Google’s Larry Page and Sergei Brin, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, and SimCity creator Will Wright were all educated as children using the self-directed, hands-on, collaborative teaching model developed by Italian doctor and educator Maria Montessori. Alas, though, not a single one has an MBA—so perhaps not a very useful factoid when you’re trying to determine the best business schools for a career in technology.

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Microsoft’s Bill Gates, Apple’s Steve Jobs, Michael Dell, Biz Stone of Twitter—none of them has an MBA either. And Facebook second-in-command Sheryl Sandberg, who does have an MBA from Harvard Business School, is famously on record recently saying the degree isn’t necessary for success in tech. Nevertheless, a growing tide of students are looking to use business school as their launch pad to successful careers in tech—and the top tech firms, including those founded by non-MBAs, are snapping them up.

Why, you ask? Read More...

It’s true. It matters when professors know their students' names

What will make students have faith in their professors?  Jeremy Wilburn ,  CC BY-NC-ND

What will make students have faith in their professors? Jeremy WilburnCC BY-NC-ND

Authored by Carole R Beal, Professor of Education, University of Florida

The new academic year is off to a start, and thousands of students have entered college for the first time.

I’ve been teaching college students for a long time, but this year, two developments have led me to think hard about my role as a professor: what it is, or rather, what it should be, with regard to undergraduates.

One involves a tenured education professor who was fired from Louisiana State University ostensibly for using profanity in class with her students. The other is the emergence of “learning analytics,” the use of software to flag students who are not doing well in a class.

Although these seem quite different on the surface, both raise questions about what professors owe their students.

Replacing certainty with uncertainty

Students do not need professors to merely pass on facts. Although it is true that today Google makes it easy to find information, Read More...